World Science Scholars

2.5 Quantum Mixing

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    • In many of the other courses you’ve heard theorists describe how they try to understand our natural world. In this course, you’ve learned a bit about how an experimentalist goes about the same task. Which do you find yourself more inclined to, the theoretical side, thinking up new science to explain phenomena, or the experimental side, being hands-on and trying to discover incredible evidence? Why?

    • i always go for the theoretical side. that is one of the reasons why i fell in love with physics. its not because i have anything against experiments. but i feel like theories and hypotheses are my thing.

    • Theory all the way!!! I have always been intrigued by the method of mathematical application in particle physics and the mathematical language that has taken root to explain quantum phenomena.

    • You can hardly leave theoretical physicists alone !! What happens if you do is something I call “run-away-maths”, leaving out any connection to experiment and/ or observation. Best evidence ? Have a look at current articles in the Cornell “arxiv”, eg. in the sections “Cosmology…” and “General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology”; pick any – you’ll hardly find answers to fundamental (or sophisticated) questions about Nature.
      Of course, any experimentalist needs his/ her fundamental background to work with; assumptions alone don’t really help.Anyway, I’m still looking for “negative mass” – and perhaps there is an answer in this very course ?!

    • They really have to go hand in hand. Without a theory, you just have empirical insight, but weak extrapolation power. Without experiments, you’ll always be left wondering whether this is simply mathematically possible, but not a reality in our universe.
      Personally, I’m more on the side of theory because then you are not bound to limitations of resources. But, I guess I’m in the minority (I would expect 99%+ of the lay persons to be more interested in actually ‘seeing’ it)

    • I am more naturally a theorist, but a theory must make predictions which can be tested.

    • I’d prefer theoretical, or philosophical more likely. Theoretical physicists study several years of math in order to understand higher physics. The modern experiments need huge investments, expensive accelerators etc. Basically home-lab experiments are for general interest. On the other hand one can learn and deepen the existing knowledge with simple experiments and calculations.

    • The best theory can be is consistent. This is necessary but not sufficient. However valid experimental results gives us reality.
      Although I do find theory fun.

    • The theoretical side, because it’s the underlying mechanism behind all of the amazing features of the universe based on mathematics which opens whole new fields of study.

    • I prefer the theoretical side, I love the pure, the theory, but that does not mean that I do not like the practical part

    • Not having given this much thought before, I think I’m drawn to the theoretical side of physics. This is where all the “child-like wonder” happens. But the experimental side has a large draw on my “look at the size of that collider” side. The shear scale of the machinery and levels of energy make my “thought juices” percolate. It’s all amazing and if I had to decide between the two for a career I’d have to do a great deal of introspection.

    • Why Quantjm Chromodynamics seems to preserve CP symmetry??

    • I’m more akin to theoretical side. Having studied theoretical philosophy as main subject.

    • In many of the other courses you’ve heard theorists describe how they try to understand our natural world. In this course, you’ve learned a bit about how an experimentalist goes about the same task. Which do you find yourself more inclined to, the theoretical side, thinking up new science to explain phenomena, or the experimental side, being hands-on and trying to discover incredible evidence? Why?

      I honestly find myself more inclined to the theoretical side because I find it more interesting, the idea of someone being able to think up various science to explain various phenomena on the back of an envelope sounds really cool to me. I also think the facts that there are theorists in this world, tells a lot about the capability of human’s mind.

      But I also think that experiment is very important, because what’s the use of a theory if it doesn’t agree with experimental result? So theory and experiment, both are just as important because they’re complimentary to one another, but if I have to choose to work as a theorist or experimentalist, I choose theorist any day.

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