World Science Scholars

5.3 Time in Motion Discussion

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    • Professor Brian Greene writes, “Our analysis has revealed the amazing fact that time does not elapse at the same rate for you as it does for me if we are moving relative to each other. This has profound implications, but can also easily be misunderstood. For example, what do you think: Does time dilation provide a way to live longer? Explain your answer.”

    • No, it doesn’t, since my internal, biological clock will be ticking at the same rate whatever I do. So I won’t live longer. What I could do is travel to the future, in the sense that if I made a journey at a very high speed and came back to the origin I would find a world where people who were my age would now be older than me, but my own life will last the same amount of time if I move than if I don’t.

    • June 3, 2020 at 10:36 am
      No, it doesn’t, since my internal, biological clock will be ticking at the same rate whatever I do. So I won’t live longer. What I could do is travel to the future, in the sense that if I made a journey at a very high speed and came back to the origin I would find a world where people who were my age would now be older than me, but my own life will last the same amount of time if I move than if I don’t.

    • no

    • No. My internal clock will always tick at a “normal” rate due to me always being stationary in relation to it.

    • No we can’t live longer because of time dilation because my internal clock is stationary with respect to me

    • if i move with a constant velocity with a clock (my clock runs slowly by a stationery person ) what about me thinking stationery person’s clock runs slowly which is correct one.

    • Not from our own perspective

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